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Thread: How to draw on pc using a mouse?

  1. #21
    Master Sorcerer Sharox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMSTYLE View Post
    I mean, I'm a very good artist. My main style of illustration is doodling. I always wanted to draw digitally because I don't need to brush my finger on my piece of art to make a light color and stuff.
    Is drawing digitally with a tablet pen any harder? I've drawn on my galaxy note S5 with its stick multiple times, I don't see any difference.
    Drawing on my tablet is much easier for me actually. You're pretty indecisve, but that's fine I was the same like, pffft it's not about the device it's about the skill. I mean I could agree with that, but investing in my Wacom tablet was one of the best decisions I've ever made, and the results show. I enjoy it much more especially comparing my mouse drawings to my current ones. There's a huge difference.
    Last edited by Sharox; 04-19-2019 at 01:22 AM.
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  2. #22
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  3. #23
    Master Sorcerer Setsune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharox View Post
    I have a Wacom Intous Pro Medium and I'm very satisfied with it. I suggest getting the Wacom Intous Small or Wacom Intous Draw, I've heard great things about those two. Pay attention though because the Intuos Pro is intended for professionals, and the Intuos is for hobbyist. Despite that I'd still suggest pro always, because the specs and drawing sensitivity is amazing.

    If you're doing digital painting on pc it's really helpful. I've drawn with my mouse before and after getting my tablet it was never the same to me. I wouldn't switch back because the mouse is just so unnatural. It doesnt have the same precision as a tablet.

    Im not sure why no one ever advises Krita. Illustration is great and it implements great vector tools, has lots of good brushes, and it's cross platform. It's not as advanced as photoshop, but well... it's free.
    There's these two cheaper alternatives that are rumored to be on par with Wacom named XP-PEN G640 and VEIKK S640, my only problem about them is the drivers. Yes I have both of them but my XP-Pen's pen got oofed

    But I would also recommend Wacom if you have the budget
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  4. #24
    Lesser Knight Grxwtopia's Avatar
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    Drawing on a phone or tablet is quite different from drawing on a laptop!

    I suggest using Krita, it comes the closest to photoshop interface-wise and is pretty good for portraits. There's a ton you can do with it and I've been a huge fan.

    For mouse drawings, stabilization is your best friend! You can google where that setting is depending on your program of choice, but basically it causes a delay in your brush stroke to even it out and make it smoother. You really just need to practice to get the hang of it, but once you do it's a pretty easy ride, especially if you have artistic background beforehand.

    I've noticed a bunch of recommendations for more of the modern Wacom products, but I'd suggest leaning away from that when you're still learning. Wacom is a GREAT brand for digital art, but if you want to check things out it's best not to buy one of the more powerful tablets. I'd go with a Bamboo Fun or a Wacom CT440 (I believe that's what they're called). They sell for about $12-25 and are pretty much impossible to wreck. Great for travel and I didn't have to install anything for either.

    I draw on a monitor (meaning I draw directly onto the screen, if that makes sense) and that upgrade happened about a year or two after I got into digital design. It's a huge step to make and I really suggest playing around with things before you move onto larger things such as that.

    Good luck!

  5. #25
    Master Sorcerer NotTheCat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wite2 View Post
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  6. #26
    Lesser Wizard MMSTYLE's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Grxwtopia;3966802]Drawing on a phone or tablet is quite different from drawing on a laptop!

    I suggest using Krita, it comes the closest to photoshop interface-wise and is pretty good for portraits. There's a ton you can do with it and I've been a huge fan.

    For mouse drawings, stabilization is your best friend! You can google where that setting is depending on your program of choice, but basically it causes a delay in your brush stroke to even it out and make it smoother. You really just need to practice to get the hang of it, but once you do it's a pretty easy ride, especially if you have artistic background beforehand.

    I've noticed a bunch of recommendations for more of the modern Wacom products, but I'd suggest leaning away from that when you're still learning. Wacom is a GREAT brand for digital art, but if you want to check things out it's best not to buy one of the more powerful tablets. I'd go with a Bamboo Fun or a Wacom CT440 (I believe that's what they're called). They sell for about $12-25 and are pretty much impossible to wreck. Great for travel and I didn't have to install anything for either.

    I draw on a monitor (meaning I draw directly onto the screen, if that makes sense) and that upgrade happened about a year or two after I got into digital design. It's a huge step to make and I really suggest playing around with things before you move onto larger things such as that.

    Alright. If a Wacom CT440 is that cheap then I don't need to wait much longer. Do they offer all the digital art settings? Like pencil, brush, eraser, shading, lightening, yellow, blue, green, etc?
    And is the screen too slippery for the pen? (You know what I mean)
    Goodbye.

  7. #27
    Master Sorcerer ChickyBro's Avatar
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    Drawing on a tablet is easy. It might be hard to use for the first time but you'll get used to it. Maybe you can buy a Huion tablet because it is cheaper than Wacom and it is high quality.

    Also Sharox prooooo... I envy you now. One thing I like about Intuos Pro is there's an eraser on a pen.

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    Oh, I forgot to say. Wacom stopped releasing 2015 Intuos models (Art, Comic, Draw, etc.) Now there's only one Wacom Intuos (2018 model). 2015 models are better in my opinion.
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  8. #28
    Lesser Knight Grxwtopia's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=MMSTYLE;3967002]
    Quote Originally Posted by Grxwtopia View Post
    Drawing on a phone or tablet is quite different from drawing on a laptop!

    I suggest using Krita, it comes the closest to photoshop interface-wise and is pretty good for portraits. There's a ton you can do with it and I've been a huge fan.

    For mouse drawings, stabilization is your best friend! You can google where that setting is depending on your program of choice, but basically it causes a delay in your brush stroke to even it out and make it smoother. You really just need to practice to get the hang of it, but once you do it's a pretty easy ride, especially if you have artistic background beforehand.

    I've noticed a bunch of recommendations for more of the modern Wacom products, but I'd suggest leaning away from that when you're still learning. Wacom is a GREAT brand for digital art, but if you want to check things out it's best not to buy one of the more powerful tablets. I'd go with a Bamboo Fun or a Wacom CT440 (I believe that's what they're called). They sell for about $12-25 and are pretty much impossible to wreck. Great for travel and I didn't have to install anything for either.

    I draw on a monitor (meaning I draw directly onto the screen, if that makes sense) and that upgrade happened about a year or two after I got into digital design. It's a huge step to make and I really suggest playing around with things before you move onto larger things such as that.

    Alright. If a Wacom CT440 is that cheap then I don't need to wait much longer. Do they offer all the digital art settings? Like pencil, brush, eraser, shading, lightening, yellow, blue, green, etc?
    And is the screen too slippery for the pen? (You know what I mean)
    I'm not sure what you mean by "all digital art settings" - A tablet doesn't play a role in that. Everything comes through your program, and it's not like you have to dip your pen in a colour to be able to use it for digital work. If you meant Krita, then yes, Krita has a full colour wheel (you can also edit this to make it easier to use - check out the Krita manual on their site), palette options in which you can preselect colors to get to them quickly, a ton of brushes (I had 200 after a few brush pack downloads, and then deleted a few to have a good range - all were free), and the CT 440 has a pen that can be turned around like a normal pencil in order to erase. Krita automatically switches to the eraser option once this is done. In my opinion, no, the CT440 wasn't slippery at all, but if you feel like it is then you can always just take off the plastic shell it comes in and instead draw on the actual surface of the tablet, which is slightly rougher and more paper-like.

  9. #29
    Lesser Wizard NoobERZin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrateNPowder View Post
    Try using the search feature on Windows and search for "Paint".
    Instead, try Win + R then type mspaint then OK.
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  10. #30
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    It's either impossible or pointless.

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